Peter Stell, counsellor, counselor at Aegis offers counselling, counseling, therapy and psychotherapy for clients, couples or those with family problems in Spalding Lincolnshire
Revd Dr Peter D. Stell - Counselling Consultant
8 Van Gogh Drive, Spalding
Lincolnshire PE11 3HU

Telephone 01775 762546
Mobile 07947 139929


E-mail:
Senior BACP Accredited and Nationally Registered Counsellor and Psychotherapist
Attachment Based Psychotherapist
Member of the Group Analytic Society International
Member of the British Psychological Society

What is Group Therapy?

Group Therapy is a form of Group Work and is related to psychotherapy, and like individual therapy, is intended to help people improve their ability to cope with problems in their lives – whether personal, family or business.

Group work can also be group supervision, coaching or mentoring. Group work is concerned with promoting wellbeing in individuals as well as healthy growth in organisations through the provision of focused group interventions, supervision and support.

The aim of group therapy is to help people resolve their emotional difficulties and to encourage personal growth, and responsibility, through participating in a group setting. When a group is working to achieve a common objective or goal, it is said that the group is working group, with a focus on promoting wholeness.

However, joining a group of strangers, which it is, may sound intimidating at first, but group therapy provides some benefits that individual therapy may not. Psychotherapists say, in fact, that group members are almost always surprised by how rewarding the group experience can be.

Groups can act as a support network and sounding board. Other members of the group often help you come up with specific ideas for improving a difficult situation or life challenge, and hold you accountable along the way.

Regularly talking and listening to others also helps you put your own problems in perspective. Many people experience mental health difficulties, but few speak openly about them to people they really don't know well.

Often, you may feel like you are the only one struggling — but you're not. It can be a relief to hear others discuss what they're going through, and realize you're not alone.

Diversity is another important benefit of group therapy. People have different personalities and backgrounds, and they look at situations in different ways. By seeing how other people tackle problems and make positive changes, you can discover a whole range of strategies for facing your own concerns.

Many groups are formed to target specific problems, such as grief, depression, obesity, panic disorder, social anxiety, chronic pain or substance abuse. Other groups focus more generally on improving social skills, helping people deal with a range of issues such as anger, shyness, attachment relationships, abuse, loneliness, guilt, shame and low self-esteem. Groups often help those who have experienced loss, whether it be a spouse, a child, or someone who committed suicide.

In my experience, group members will start out as strangers, but in a short amount of time, you'll most likely view them as a valuable and trusted source of support.

Groups can act as a support network and sounding board
you may feel like you are the only one struggling
Groups often help those who have experienced loss
 

In group therapy, members of the group share with others personal issues which they are facing. Group members are encouraged to talk about:
To encourage
To challenge or give support

How Does it Work?

In group therapy, members of the group share with others personal issues which they are facing. Group members are encouraged to talk about:
  1. Events they have been involved in.
  2. Their responses to these events.
  3. Problems they have avoided, dismissed or worked with.

In an atmosphere of safety and confidentiality, members are encouraged to share their thoughts about what happened in previous sessions, and relate to issues raised by other members or what the facilitator said or did.

Members then have an opportunity to:

  1. To give feedback.
  2. To encourage.
  3. To challenge or give support or
  4. To share their thoughts and feelings in response to what they heard – or thought they heard.

People we meet in a group setting bring with them unresolved conflicts, memories and relationships from the past with whom they have experienced some difficulty, which may include trauma and abuse. These unresolved conflicts promote anxiety and show themselves in the distorted way they relate to other people in the group. Group therapy offers an ideal opportunity to discuss and work through these difficult situations in an atmosphere of trust. An opportunity to deal with the past, in the present!


What You Can Expect From Me

Ideally, you can expect there to be between 6 to 10 members in a group. Above 12 members, it is difficult to create a therapeutic atmosphere and have enough time for each member to work personally. Meeting on a regular basis, sessions usually last up to an hour and a half. The duration of the group depends on such things as the severity of the problems presented and the outcomes that are being sought. Groups of private individuals usually run for a several months, while groups in organisations tend to be facilitated over a shorter period.

I believe that by maintaining confidentiality and safe boundaries, a group is built on a sure foundation. It is on the basis of providing a secure base that I facilitate group process. Without firm boundaries, there can be no trust, without trust there can be no challenge and change. My work as a group therapist, supervisor and coach is endorsed by the Group Analytic Society International and my credentials include extensive group work in prisons and higher diploma qualifications in group therapy. Click here to contact me.

Peter Stell

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Revd Dr Peter D. Stell - Counselling Consultant
Telephone 01775 762546 Mobile 07947 139929
E-mail:
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Senior BACP Accredited and Nationally Registered Counsellor and Psychotherapist
Member of the Group Analytic Society International
Member of the British Psychological Society