Peter Stell, counsellor supervisor, counselor at Aegis offers supervision for professional counsellors. BACP, UKRC registered, member of Group Analytic Society (London). Based in Spalding, Lincolnshire UK.
Revd Dr Peter D. Stell - Counselling Consultant
8 Van Gogh Drive, Spalding
Lincolnshire PE11 3HU

Telephone 01775 762546
Mobile 07947 139929


E-mail:
Senior BACP Accredited and Nationally Registered Counsellor and Psychotherapist
Attachment Based Psychotherapist
Member of the Group Analytic Society International
Member of the British Psychological Society
On the face of it, Spirituality and Counselling may not appear to have much in common, but we are becoming more aware that some aspects of spirituality can offer some real benefits for improving our mental health and well-being.
Thing is, you don't need to hold a formal religious belief, or belong to an established faith tradition to experience spirituality.

There is not one definition of spirituality:

  • It is something everyone can experience – it is part of being human
  • It helps us find meaning and purpose in the things we truly value in life
  • It can bring hope and healing in times of trauma, suffering and loss
  • It encourages us to seek out the best relationship with ourselves, others and what lies beyond

Spirituality often becomes more important to people in times of emotional stress, physical and mental illness, trauma, loss, bereavement and the approach of death.
Health care tries to relieve pain and to cure, while spirituality emphasises the healing of the 'whole person,' not just the disease. It views life as a journey, where good and bad experiences can help a person to learn, develop and mature.

Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do

How is spirituality is different from religion?

Religious traditions certainly include individual spirituality, which is universal, but each world faith has its unique footprint in respect of beliefs, worship, sacred texts and traditions.
Spirituality is not necessarily tied to any particular religious belief or tradition. Although culture and beliefs can play a part in spirituality, every person has their own unique experience of spirituality - it can be a personal experience for anyone, with or without a religious belief. It's there for everyone. Spirituality also highlights how connected we are to other people, nature, creation and the world.

What is spiritual health care?

People with mental health problems have said that they want:
  • To feel safe with a secure base
  • To be treated with dignity and respect
  • To feel that they belong and are valued and trusted
  • Time to express their thoughts and feelings, and to be heard
  • Engage meaningful activities such as creative art, music or enjoying nature
  • The chance to make sense of their life – including illness and loss
  • Unconditional support to pray and meditate, and develop a special relationship with God or higher power
Someone with a religious belief may need:
  • Time, opportunity, and a private space in which to pray, meditate and worship
  • The chance to explore their spiritual concerns with a counsellor
  • Be reassured that the spiritual counsellor will respect their faith
  • Be given positive encouragement to deepen their faith
  • To be helped with the personal need for forgiveness and healing

What difference can spirituality make? - and what can be gained?

  • Better self-awareness, self-control, self-esteem, and self-confidence
  • Faster and easier recovery (often through healthy grieving of losses and through recognising their strengths)
  • Better relationships – with self, others and with God/higher power/creation/nature
  • A new sense of meaning, hope and peace of mind. This new confidence has enabled people to accept and live with continuing problems, or to make changes where possible.

Some questions for you:

Would you say you are spiritual or religious in any way? and What gives you hope? What keeps you going in difficult times? and What helpful knowledge or strengths do you have that can be encouraged? Also, What support can a spiritual counsellor, guide of member of your faith community offer? Answers to these questions help reveal a person's main spiritual concerns and practices. In fact, simply exploring spiritual issues can be therapeutic in itself!

"It's about you!" - setting the scene:

What is your life all about? Is there something that gives you a sense of meaning or purpose?

The past

Emotional stress is often caused by major life changes, loss, or the threat of loss. Have you had any major losses, or traumas, or bereavements, or suffered abuse? How have these experiences affected you? Do they remain unresolved?

The present

Do you feel that you belong and that you are valued? Do you have secure base attachments with God and the people in your life? Do you feel safe and respected? Are you and other people able to communicate clearly and freely? Do you feel that there is a spiritual aspect to your current situation? Would it help to connect with a spiritual counsellor, or someone from your faith community? What needs to be understood about your religious or spiritual background?

The future

What do the next few weeks, months or years hold for you? Are you worried about your life, career, relationships, physical or mental health, death and dying, or about the possibility of an afterlife? Would you want to discuss this more? What are your main fears about the future? Do you feel the need for forgiveness about anything? What, if anything, gives you hope?
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do
Therapy is the place to begin to piece together aspects of the puzzle that lead people to behave in the ways they do

The next step

What kind of support would work for you? How could you best be helped to get it?

As the title 'Reverend' suggests, I offer empathic ways in which people can explore their important concerns about spirituality, whether from a sacred or secular perspective. I am a Christian Priest in the Church of England, but I value people of All Faiths and those people who define Spirituality in Non-Religious ways. My quest is to accompany people of their spiritual journey and help them reflect on what matters most in their lives as they move towards healing and wholeness. My other title is 'Doctor.' I have a PhD and numerous qualifications in counselling and psychotherapy which, together with my life and work experience, can help motivate people to make sense of their relationship with people, mental health and their spiritual life. For the spiritual journey, my way of helping people is to offer genuine compassion-focussed counselling and sensitive forgiveness therapy so that people can move on with their lives.

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Revd Dr Peter D. Stell - Counselling Consultant
Telephone 01775 762546 Mobile 07947 139929
E-mail:
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Senior BACP Accredited and Nationally Registered Counsellor and Psychotherapist
Member of the Group Analytic Society International
Member of the British Psychological Society